Insights

Vysali Soundararajan, Esq.

Assistant Vice President, Corporate Counsel

Vysali serves as Woodruff Sawyer’s Corporate Counsel. She is also a claims consultant on management liability policies, including Directors & Officers, Employment Practices, Cyber, and Errors & Omissions. Previously a class action litigator, Vysali is a frequent author and presenter, and is adjunct faculty on negotiation at RISE Austin and on intellectual property at University of Texas at Austin.  

415.399.6472

LinkedIn

Vysali Soundararajan, Esq.

Assistant Vice President, Corporate Counsel

Vysali serves as Woodruff Sawyer’s Corporate Counsel. She is also a claims consultant on management liability policies, including Directors & Officers, Employment Practices, Cyber, and Errors & Omissions. Previously a class action litigator, Vysali is a frequent author and presenter, and is adjunct faculty on negotiation at RISE Austin and on intellectual property at University of Texas at Austin.  

415.399.6472

LinkedIn

The SEC’s Curiosity about Unicorns

The Securities and Exchange Commission can—and will—investigate private companies. As SEC Chair Mary Jo White discussed in a recent speech at Stanford University Rock Center for Corporate Governance, the SEC’s core mission is to protect investors, whether public or private. Private companies are not beyond the reach of securities regulations or the “official curiosity” of SEC investigators.

IPO Companies, Section 11 Suits and California State Court

In 2009, a group of shareholders filed suit in federal court against CardioNet, a company that had recently completed its IPO. The shareholders sued pursuant to Section 10(b) of the Securities Act of 1934. The federal court dismissed the case. However, in 2010, another group of shareholders filed suit in California state court against the same company under Section 11 of the Securities Act of 1933. Within two years, that case settled for more than $7 million.